M100 On 03-11-2008

Done with my 17.5 inch scope and SBIG ST-9E CCD camera

Spiral Galaxy M100 (NGC 4321) 

The galaxy M100 is one of the brightest members of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies. The galaxy is in the spring constellation Coma Berenices. M100 is spiral shaped, like our Milky Way, and tilted nearly face-on as seen from earth. The galaxy has two prominent arms of bright stars and several fainter arms. M100 has been imaged extensively by the Hubble Space Telescope, which led to the discovery of over 20 Cepheids and a distance determination of 56 million light years.

Four supernovae have been observed in M100: 1901B, a type I, mag 15.6 in March 1901; 1914A of undetermined type, mag 15.7 in Feb/Mar 1914; 1959E of type I, mag 17.5 in Aug/Sep 1959; and 1979C of type II, mag 11.6 on April 15, 1979. 

Right ascension 12 : 20.4 (hours : minutes)
Declination +16 : 06 (degrees : minutes)
Distance 56,000,000 light years
Visual magnitude 10.6 

OBJECT = M100
TELESCOPE = 17.5 inch f4.5
CAMERA = ST7-E 
OBSERVER = Rusty Fletcher 
LOCATION = Seguin Outdoor Learning Center 
DATE (Yr-Mo-Dy) = 2005-12-29
TIME (UT) = 10:31:32
TOTAL EXPOSURE = 300 sec
IMAGES STACKED = 5

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